Archive

The COVID-19 Pandemic isn’t the Only Outbreak We Need to Face

BY VANESSA BLAS The first case of the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19, was reported in Wuhan, China in December 2019 and has spread to 185 countries in just three months.1,2 However, the virus is not the only outbreak that is spreading rapidly–the pandemic has become racialized, targeting millions of Asians and Asian Americans. COVID-19 is … Continue reading The COVID-19 Pandemic isn’t the Only Outbreak We Need to Face

Palliative Care: An Analgesic in an Impossible Time

BY SHAAN BHANDARKAR The coronavirus pandemic has forced healthcare providers into a difficult ethical gridlock. How do physicians choose which patients to treat with a serious deficit in essential supplies like ventilators? What consolations can physicians offer families who cannot meet their loved ones in their final moments? In many horrific ways, the pandemic has … Continue reading Palliative Care: An Analgesic in an Impossible Time

Modelling Equity in Global Health: Using Participatory Action Research to Bridge the Gap Between International Agencies and People in Southern Africa

BY SAM BRAKARSH Introduction Global health is a paradigm aimed at increasing equity through access to health. However, it is riddled with contradictions. It operates within a hierarchy of power where decisions are frequently made at a great distance from those upon which the interventions are enacted and so the voices of communities are lost. … Continue reading Modelling Equity in Global Health: Using Participatory Action Research to Bridge the Gap Between International Agencies and People in Southern Africa

How Climate Change May Fuel the EEE Outbreaks in the United States

BY VANESSA BLAS Between August and October 2019, the Center for Disease Control received word of over thirty cases of patients infected with the eastern encephalitis virus, including twelve deaths, confirming a series of unprecedented outbreaks occurring in the United States.1 Three of those deaths occurred in Connecticut. A press release by Connecticut Governor Ned … Continue reading How Climate Change May Fuel the EEE Outbreaks in the United States

The Hypocrisy of Hippocrates: Ethics from Medical Oaths

BY SHAAN BHANDARKAR Long before the horrors of Tuskegee and Mengele, medical ethics claimed a center stage in the world of healing dating back to the times of Ancient Greece. Throughout the Classical era, patients reserved a comparable trust in both faith healers and the more traditional practitioners, who received training from other established practitioners … Continue reading The Hypocrisy of Hippocrates: Ethics from Medical Oaths

Expanding Emergency Contraceptive Access: An Exploration of the Pros, Cons and Current Conversation on a U.S. and Global Scale

BY RYAN SUTHERLAND, FRANCESCA MAVIGLIA, ALEJANDRA MONCAYO, JULIA SPINNENWEBER Emergency contraception (EC) is a key tool for women to avert unintended pregnancy in a safe and effective manner shortly after having unprotected sex. EC is designed to be used in cases of non-use or inconsistent use of other contraception, and there are two categories of … Continue reading Expanding Emergency Contraceptive Access: An Exploration of the Pros, Cons and Current Conversation on a U.S. and Global Scale

The State of the Field: Legislation Addressing Disparities in Birth Outcomes and Maternal Mortality among Black Mothers and Infants

BY RYAN SUTHERLAND Introduction  A recent study by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development found that among the top economically developed nations, the United States ranks first for child mortality and 47th in the world among all nations for maternal mortality.1 More than 50,000 American mothers each year will experience life-threatening, pregnancy-related complications and … Continue reading The State of the Field: Legislation Addressing Disparities in Birth Outcomes and Maternal Mortality among Black Mothers and Infants

The Power of Human Touch

BY NINA UZOIGWE Caregiving across continental borders is a multifaceted experience within global healthcare. Arthur Kleinman, a professor of medical anthropology and cross-cultural psychiatry at Harvard University, stated in his publication in the Lancet that caregiving is “a deeply interpersonal, relational practice that resonates with the most troubling preoccupations of both carer and sufferer”.¹ In … Continue reading The Power of Human Touch

Tuberculosis: Returning to the Disease that Never Disappeared

BY KELLY FARLEY One third of the world’s population is infected with a latent form of it.1 Without treatment, 50% of those with the active form will die.2 We have a cure. And yet every day 5,000 people die of tuberculosis (TB).2 Background TB is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis.3  A … Continue reading Tuberculosis: Returning to the Disease that Never Disappeared

The American Response to the AIDS Epidemic Among African Americans and Continental Africans

BY DEBBIE DADA “How we think about disease determines who lives and dies.”1 This is a quote from 1986 by Evelynn Hammonds, a scholar of the History of Science and African-American Studies. How does the manner in which disease is perceived affect the level of governmental and community mobilization to help afflicted populations? How might … Continue reading The American Response to the AIDS Epidemic Among African Americans and Continental Africans

70th World Health Assembly Recap

BY MATTHEW PETTUS This past May, leaders of health from across the globe met in Geneva, Switzerland to participate in the 70th World Health Assembly. Serving as the highest level decision-making body in health policy, the World Health Assembly assembles health ambassadors from 194 member states to oversee how the World Health Organization (WHO) is … Continue reading 70th World Health Assembly Recap

Coinfections: Managing a dynamic network of diseases

BY COLIN HEMEZ When it comes to infectious diseases, the presence of one usually means the presence of many. Differences in environment, socioeconomics, and even genetics all conspire to leave some populations with high burdens of many diseases and other populations with low burdens of few diseases. This inconsistent distribution unfortunately results in many cases … Continue reading Coinfections: Managing a dynamic network of diseases

Bangladesh: In Practice

BY SREEJA KODALI Last summer I had the immense privilege of travelling to Dhaka, Bangladesh to assist in the implementation of a new epidemiological study from Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) at the National Institute of Neuro-Sciences (NINS). The study, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), investigates the relationship between epidemic arsenic poisoning and … Continue reading Bangladesh: In Practice

Consider the ASHA: A Qualitative Analysis of Accredited Social Health Activists’ Experiences in Udaipur, India

BY SARA LOCKE Khushi Baby is a wearable mHealth platform tracking maternal and child health to the last mile. Its mission is to reduce infant and maternal mortality due to vaccine-preventable disease. As explained in the Khushi Baby 2016 Annual Report, the Khushi Baby system comprises of a culturally tailored NFC necklace, which digitally stores … Continue reading Consider the ASHA: A Qualitative Analysis of Accredited Social Health Activists’ Experiences in Udaipur, India

Why International Agreements Won’t Solve the Health Crisis of Palm Oil Deforestation in Indonesia

BY AKIELLY HU Last spring break, I had the opportunity to travel to Indonesia to learn about sustainable palm oil with a group from the Yale International Relations Association. As a naïve freshman, I remember asking the group leaders before we left, “What sorts of activism efforts might we do once we get back on … Continue reading Why International Agreements Won’t Solve the Health Crisis of Palm Oil Deforestation in Indonesia

CRISPR/Cas9 and The Future of Global Health

BY AKHIL UPNEJA The discovery of CRISPR/Cas9 has revolutionized the field of genetic engineering in countless ways. From targeting genes conferring antibiotic resistance to creating disease models in animals, the technique offers scientists a fast, cheap, and accurate alternative to every other gene-editing system on the market. While its applications in human disease continue to … Continue reading CRISPR/Cas9 and The Future of Global Health

Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

BY SARAH SPAULDING Throughout much of known human history and prehistory, tuberculosis (TB) has surged and receded along a time scale that challenges much of the accepted scientific understanding of typical epidemic cycles of infectious diseases. Written records of TB appear in Greek literature dating as far back as 460 BCE, with Hippocrates’ description of … Continue reading Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

Digital Health in the Context of China’s Healthcare System

BY MEGAN LAM China’s “Medical Ruckus” March, 2012: Li Mengnan, 17, walked into the First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University in Northern China. He carried a four-inch fruit knife. He impaled the first person he encountered in the neck, injured several medical staff, and then unsuccessfully tried to kill himself before fleeing the scene. … Continue reading Digital Health in the Context of China’s Healthcare System

Zika as a Catalyst for Reproductive Rights Reform in Latin America

BY GRACIE JIN 18-year-old Ianka Barbosa cradles her baby daughter, Sophia, in her parents’ tiny brick house in northeast Brazil. She was 7 months pregnant when she learned that Sophia had microcephaly, the incurable condition causing atypically small heads, severe birth defects, and intellectual disability, which doctors blamed on the Zika virus. Before Sophia was … Continue reading Zika as a Catalyst for Reproductive Rights Reform in Latin America

A Legacy of Imperialism: Health Disparities in the Pacific

BY ERICA KOCHER The Pacific Islands, sometimes known as Oceania, include the regions of Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. These three regions encompass tens of thousands of islands, each of which has a distinct culture. Although Oceania covers approximately 15% of the Earth’s surface area and is home to millions of Pacific Islanders, the unique issues … Continue reading A Legacy of Imperialism: Health Disparities in the Pacific

A New World Health Organization: The Search for a Director-General

BY MATTHEW PETTUS Dr. Margaret Chan, Hong Kong-Canadian physician and Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), will be leaving her position this June, after a ten-year term. This means that the World Health Assembly must commence the search for a new Director-General, someone who can poignantly address the intersection between policy, global health, and … Continue reading A New World Health Organization: The Search for a Director-General

Failure to Fund: The Mexico City Policy’s Impact on Global Health

BY CAROLINE TANGOREN On January 23rd, just two days after the historic Women’s March on Washington demonstrated popular support for women’s rights, President Trump signed an executive order to reinstate the Mexico City Policy, dealing a horrible blow to women’s health globally.1 Broadly speaking, this hot-topic policy prevents any international non-governmental organization (NGO) that provides … Continue reading Failure to Fund: The Mexico City Policy’s Impact on Global Health

White Male Suicide: The Exception to Privelege

BY LAURA MICHAEL In recent years, both the American government and public have given increasing amounts of attention to mental health issues and awareness on college campuses and among adolescents. While college students and adolescents represent two vulnerable populations in America, they are not necessarily at the highest risk for suicide. Although white men historically … Continue reading White Male Suicide: The Exception to Privelege

Colonialism, Civil War, and Ebola: Historical Perspectives On Contemporary Healthcare in Sierra Leone

BY ELIJAH RAMI During the mid-twentieth century, the British Empire rapidly succumbed to a striking decline. After the Second World War, its colonies in Africa and the Caribbean in particular witnessed a wave of nationalist movements that began to call for self-determination and independence from bureaucratic colonial administrations. Sierra Leone gained independence from the United … Continue reading Colonialism, Civil War, and Ebola: Historical Perspectives On Contemporary Healthcare in Sierra Leone

Strange Ways: What Virus Evolution Can Tell Us About the Next Epidemic

BY COLIN HEMEZ A New Virus Emerges In mid-November of 2002, a few farmers in the Guangdong province of China began falling ill with pneumonia-like symptoms. This was not necessarily out of the ordinary for the region, but the disease spread rapidly, infecting some 806 people and killing 34 by mid-February of 20031. A doctor … Continue reading Strange Ways: What Virus Evolution Can Tell Us About the Next Epidemic

Is Fracking Safe?

BY EMMA PHELPS Hydraulic fracturing, commonly referred to as fracking, is a drilling technique that allows the extraction of previously inaccessible natural gas from shale formations. The United States has experienced a fracking boom in the last decade. In February of 2016, the United States was producing 92 billion cubic feet of natural gas per … Continue reading Is Fracking Safe?

Healthcare: Is there only one correct answer?

BY ELIZABETH LI The United States (US) healthcare system and the European healthcare system are ideologically and functionally different. When it comes to rankings, the US consistently ranks below other countries, such as France, Germany, and the United Kingdom in terms of life expectancy and health-care spending per capita. This disparity in the rankings begs … Continue reading Healthcare: Is there only one correct answer?

Delhi’s Air Pollution and Its Effects on Children’s Health

BY REBECCA SLUTSKY Which of our world’s cities has the worst air pollution? According to the World Health Organization, it’s Delhi, the capital of India.1 Although air pollution affects the entire population of this metropolis, Delhi’s children are the most defenseless against its toxic effects. Recent studies have confirmed serious deterioration of air quality in … Continue reading Delhi’s Air Pollution and Its Effects on Children’s Health

Transforming the Narrative of Bangladesh’s ‘Mini-Deserts’

BY MINH VU Situated on the Ganges Delta and the Bay of Bengal, the nation of Bangladesh is constantly devastated by flooding from the 230 rivers surrounding it. Pockets of farming villages often have their growing crops and farmland destroyed by the torrential water, forcing families to leave in search of new villages and livelihoods. … Continue reading Transforming the Narrative of Bangladesh’s ‘Mini-Deserts’

PTSD in Children and Adolescents: Equivalent Exposures, Distinct Diagnoses

BY HOLLY ROBINSON One in four children living in the United States experiences a traumatic event before reaching adulthood.1 These distressing encounters, which include experiences from sexual abuse to natural disasters, affect the mental health of the individual as well as the overall wellbeing of the population. Because they are still in their formative years, … Continue reading PTSD in Children and Adolescents: Equivalent Exposures, Distinct Diagnoses

Bringing Sustainable Healthcare to Under-Resourced Populations: Field Experiences from OneWorld Health

BY ONEWORLD HEALTH Global health is a rapidly growing field, and the need to improve access to high-quality care in developing countries has become increasingly apparent. Various charitable organizations, missionaries, and NGOs have attempted to supplement the health care provided by the government with short-term relief efforts. However, there is still a desperate need for … Continue reading Bringing Sustainable Healthcare to Under-Resourced Populations: Field Experiences from OneWorld Health

Gaining Ground: Implementation Research and Viral Load Monitoring in Kampala, Uganda

BY ISLA HUTCHINSON MADDOX HIV/AIDS and Viral Load Monitoring in Uganda At the 21st International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa in July 2016, a prevailing sense of optimism filled the room as thousands of the brightest minds in HIV/AIDS research and care flooded the Durban International Convention Centre. This annual conference provides a unique … Continue reading Gaining Ground: Implementation Research and Viral Load Monitoring in Kampala, Uganda

Jamaica’s Nursing Problem

BY AKHIL UPNEJA On January 10th, 2017, NPR published a piece highlighting the dire shortage of specialized nurses in Jamaica. Jamaica’s nursing population numbers 4500, with 1000 of these nurses specialized to work in urgent-care facilities such as intensive care units (ICUs) and emergency rooms.1 However, over the past few years, there has been a … Continue reading Jamaica’s Nursing Problem

Public Policy in Chinese and Indian Public Hospitals

BY JING (SARAH) SHEN China The Chinese public hospital system is widely influenced by its federal policy towards healthcare. With shifts in policy in the past century, the country rapidly reformed its healthcare system . In the 20th century China’s economy underwent drastic changes from being a centrally planned, command economy to a capitalist, market-based … Continue reading Public Policy in Chinese and Indian Public Hospitals

A Conversation with Kaveh Khoshnood: Paths Through a Career in Global Health

BY CASSIE LIGNELLI Kaveh Khoshnood knows global health. He has been at the Yale School of Public Health since completing his MPH, working almost exclusively on HIV/AIDS and health among the most vulnerable populations in the US and worldwide. Even more remarkably, he has devoted his career to training the next generation of public health … Continue reading A Conversation with Kaveh Khoshnood: Paths Through a Career in Global Health

America’s Forgotten Cities: Public Health Crises in the Texas Colonias

BY ELI RAMI Texas is the second most populous state in the US. An economic powerhouse of the United States, if Texas were a sovereign nation it would rank as the fourteenth largest economy in the world.1 With a gross state product of over 1.6 trillion dollars in 2014, Texas has the second largest state … Continue reading America’s Forgotten Cities: Public Health Crises in the Texas Colonias

Food Insecurity: In the “Salad Bowl of America”

BY CLAIRE CHANG Nicknamed the “salad bowl of America,” the Salinas Valley of Monterey County, California, reigns as one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. As a whole, Monterey County contributes significantly to America’s total annual vegetable production. For example, the county produces 61% of leaf lettuce, 57% of celery, 56% of … Continue reading Food Insecurity: In the “Salad Bowl of America”

The Unseen Consequences of War: Responding to Sri Lanka’s Mental Health Burden

BY OHVIA MURALEETHARAN Although many refer to Sri Lanka as a success story in achieving high health outcomes despite its low income, a crucial side of its past often remains unaddressed. An island country of only 25,300 square miles, Sri Lanka has a bloody history, full of war and ethnic conflict.1 After a brutal 50-year … Continue reading The Unseen Consequences of War: Responding to Sri Lanka’s Mental Health Burden

Dengue Fever: Endemic to Epidemic

BY SARAH SPAULDING Today, a bite from the wrong mosquito can cause severe fever, organ failure, and even death. No, this mosquito is not carrying malaria as you may have thought, it is carrying dengue. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), dengue fever is a viral infection carried by female mosquitoes of the species … Continue reading Dengue Fever: Endemic to Epidemic

Republic of Korea: An Increased Response to a Decreased Fertility Rate

BY SUKRITI MOHAN In a world where we often worry about overpopulation, there are certain nations struggling to stimulate higher numbers of births. Concern about declining fertility and birth rates has risen drastically during the last few decades, and many worry that the decreased number of young residents will weaken the future labor force and … Continue reading Republic of Korea: An Increased Response to a Decreased Fertility Rate

Depression in Mexico: Stigma and its Policy Implications

BY DIANA GONZALEZ AND MAURICIO ALVAREZ The Vice-Minister of Integration and Development of the Health Sector of the Mexican Ministry of Health, Eduardo González Pier, claims that “an important segment of the population with a mental health problem does not seek medical attention, simply because they do not consider it an illness; however, this is … Continue reading Depression in Mexico: Stigma and its Policy Implications

Ireland: Restrictions on Abortion

BY ARIELA ZEBEDE Ireland has some of the strictest abortion laws in the world, only allowing abortion in order to save the life of the mother. The laws are unclear in some situations, however, sometimes leaving pregnant women trapped in situations that may damage their mental or physical health. Moreover, victims of rape and incest … Continue reading Ireland: Restrictions on Abortion

At The Helm: United States Foreign Policy and Reproductive Rights

BY AVIVA RABIN-COURT In January 1973, the United States Supreme Court passed Roe v. Wade. That case, a watershed decision, acknowledged a constitutional right to abortions and rejected a theory of personhood based on religious convictions, creating a more secular national policy.1 Roe v. Wade shifted the national understanding of abortion from a largely criminal … Continue reading At The Helm: United States Foreign Policy and Reproductive Rights

Pakistan & Brazil: The Current Narrative of Healthcare Reform

BY MAHRUKH SHAHID Earlier this year, the Prime Minister (PM) of Pakistan, Nawaz Sharif, launched a state-run health insurance program called the Prime Minister’s Health Program (PMHP). The scheme initially targeted 15 districts, but PM Sharif quickly announced plans to expand PMHP to 23 districts and expressed hope that the program would soon become available … Continue reading Pakistan & Brazil: The Current Narrative of Healthcare Reform

Russia: The Sickness of a Nation

BY CHANEY KALINICH The probability that a 15-year-old boy in Russia will die before he reaches the age of 60 is greater than 40%.1 The ongoing health crisis in Russia presents a frightening picture of a nation’s leaders undermining its own citizens’ lives through neglect, corruption, and a quest for power. Russia is a wealthy … Continue reading Russia: The Sickness of a Nation

Blood Transfusion Costs

BY COLIN HEMEZ In mid-November 2016, the United States Food and Drug Administration announced that it now requires all blood banks in the country to test for Zika virus in blood donations. Many banks have already begun complying, and results suggest that Zika prevalence remains extremely low in the United States — of the 800,000 … Continue reading Blood Transfusion Costs

Sex Education in India: A Public Problem with a Private Solution?

BY AKILA SHANMUGHAM Housing over a quarter million of the world’s adolescents within its boundaries, India provides the counterpoint to Japan’s hyper-aging society.1 While a society of young people presents the potential for a revitalized workforce and a progressive societal spirit, it must have the resources necessary for the cultivation of its young populace—including sex … Continue reading Sex Education in India: A Public Problem with a Private Solution?

Trump’s Healthcare Proposals

BY EMMA PHELPS Although Donald Trump promised to “not let people die in the streets” throughout his campaign,1 his healthcare proposals will increase the number of Americans without healthcare coverage and make insurance unaffordable for many low and middle-income Americans. He has laid out his bare-bones plan to repeal Obamacare, “modernize” Medicare and “maximize flexibility … Continue reading Trump’s Healthcare Proposals

Blue Gold: The Global Cost of Water Privatization

BY FRANCES FAGAN Major shifts in the availability and purity of water have already begun to affect the health of the Earth’s water cycle and water-dependent ecosystems. Through carbon emissions and other unregulated business practices, we spew large quantities of harmful pollutants into the atmosphere that leech into our soil and limited groundwater reservoirs. This … Continue reading Blue Gold: The Global Cost of Water Privatization

Red Meat and Processed Meat and the Risk of Cancer

BY REBECCA SLUTSKY It’s a tough time for lovers of hot dogs, bacon and beef jerky. After twenty years of research, the World Health Organization’s cancer research group recently announced that there is significant evidence that processed meat is a carcinogen that can cause colorectal cancer in humans.1 In addition, the research concluded that there … Continue reading Red Meat and Processed Meat and the Risk of Cancer

Autism Spectrum Disorder and the Pediatric Emergency Department

BY AVA HUNT In recent years, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been at the center of one media frenzy after another. Although far less data exist about the prevalence of ASD outside of the United States, the rising prevalence of autism, the apocryphal allegations that autism could be caused by vaccines, and the increased portrayal … Continue reading Autism Spectrum Disorder and the Pediatric Emergency Department

Inclusion, Not Exclusion: Expanding Healthcare Access to Undocumented Immigrants in California

BY JADE HARVEY With 2.55 out of the nation’s 11.2 million undocumented immigrants living in California, the Golden State is host to the nation’s largest percentage of undocumented immigrants in the country. While undocumented immigrants make up approximately 6.8 percent of the state’s residents, they also represent an overwhelming 24 percent of the uninsured population.1 … Continue reading Inclusion, Not Exclusion: Expanding Healthcare Access to Undocumented Immigrants in California

A Conversation with Joanna Radin: A Historical Approach to Global Health

BY ANABEL STAROSTA Professor Joanna Radin is an Assistant Professor of History of Science and Medicine, and last semester taught a course called Historical Perspectives on Global Health. Today, the term global health describes a crucial, widespread framework that brings together public health workers, philanthropists, economists, politicians, activists, and students worldwide. But global health did not simply spring up … Continue reading A Conversation with Joanna Radin: A Historical Approach to Global Health

Turning a Blind Eye: A Look at Unjust Health Outcomes among the Deaf, Blind, and Physically Disabled

BY HOLLY ROBINSON Health care providers have a responsibility to the most vulnerable members of their communities. However, problems arise when a population’s most vulnerable members are not part of the community, when they are pushed to the side and deemed unfit to contribute to society. This is the reality for many around the world … Continue reading Turning a Blind Eye: A Look at Unjust Health Outcomes among the Deaf, Blind, and Physically Disabled

Where Being Queer is a Risk Factor: The Unseen Health Effects of Being Gay in Southeast Asia

BY SARAH HOUSEHOLDER On June 27th, 2015, hundreds of Americans waiting outside the Supreme Court building erupted into cheers as it was announced that the Supreme Court had officially ruled that “same-sex marriage is a legal right.”1 Celebrations across the nation broke out and couples rushed to courthouses to legalize longstanding relationships. On such a … Continue reading Where Being Queer is a Risk Factor: The Unseen Health Effects of Being Gay in Southeast Asia

Zika: What History Can Tell Us About the Current Epidemic

BY ELI RAMI ZIKV, more commonly known as the Zika virus, has quickly evolved from a little-researched virus into a global public health threat. Virologists first discovered the pathogen during the late 1940s in a species of monkey that inhabits Uganda’s Zika forest. For decades, scientists believed that ZIKV was a mosquito-borne virus that could … Continue reading Zika: What History Can Tell Us About the Current Epidemic

Photo Feature – Brazil

Risk of Zika for Brazil’s Indigenous BY HARLAND DAHL Although most cases remain concentrated in northeastern and southeastern Brazil, the distribution of the Zika virus continues to grow throughout the country. As of February, Brazil was one of thirty countries in the Americas facing a Zika threat. Since the outbreak of Zika virus in Brazil, … Continue reading Photo Feature – Brazil

Addressing Urban Violence: The “Cure Violence” Public Health Approach

BY SOPHIA KECSKES This July, in response to the tragic killing of a seven-year-old boy in Chicago, Mayor Rahm Emanuel said, “adults here are letting the children down—from failures of the criminal justice system to the immoral nature of street gangs. You have a time and place where you have too many guns on the … Continue reading Addressing Urban Violence: The “Cure Violence” Public Health Approach

Saying Goodbye to China’s One Child Policy and Aging Population

BY VICTORIA LOO Over the past decade, the demographic of the world population has always been unbalanced with young children outnumbering elderly people. However, the proportion of the world’s population over 60 years of age is rapidly growing, and between 2015 and 2050 it will reach a new high of nearly 714 million of the … Continue reading Saying Goodbye to China’s One Child Policy and Aging Population

Photo Feature – Burma

BY KIRA TEBBE The leaders of my gap year program had heard about a nearby refugee camp. There were Burmese citizens who had fled to the border of Burma and China, where crossing the river would bring them into China. We timed our visit with a global health organization, who was there for regular vaccinations. … Continue reading Photo Feature – Burma

An Evolutionary Perspective on Ebola and Marburg Viruses

BY RACHEL ARNESEN “Ebola in the air? A nightmare that could happen.” “Ebola: World Goes on Red Alert.” “Ebola: ‘The ISIS of Biological Agents.’” These headlines, taken from real CNN and BBC articles, capture all too well the fear mongering that occurred during the most recent outbreak of Ebola in West Africa. From 1996 to … Continue reading An Evolutionary Perspective on Ebola and Marburg Viruses

To Cook or Not to Cook?

BY MAHRUKH SHAHID “To cook or not to cook is a consequential question”.1 The above quote is one of the parting words from Michael Pollan’s documentary Cooked—a four-part miniseries divided into the classical elements: air, earth, fire, and water. Pollan shows us the science, and magic, behind the transformation of these elements into food. His … Continue reading To Cook or Not to Cook?

Ecuador’s Earthquake: The Mental Health Consequences of Natural Disasters

BY CARLIN SHERIDAN On April 16, 2016 a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Ecuador, killing 659 people and injuring over 16,600.1 As the nation begins its emergency response, the disaster sheds light on the weaknesses of its health infrastructure. Natural disasters can be characterized as a health issue because in addition to causing physical injuries, they also destroy urban, … Continue reading Ecuador’s Earthquake: The Mental Health Consequences of Natural Disasters

Diabetes: Health Inequity of Mexican Immigrants in the United States

BY ANABEL STAROSTA In the United States, Latino immigrants are especially affected by certain illnesses due to social and structural factors beyond their control. Latino immigrants often work as disenfranchised laborers, experience ethnic and cultural discrimination, and remain in low socioeconomic conditions. 1 While certain negative health outcomes are equally prevalent across the greater Latino population, Mexican immigrants in … Continue reading Diabetes: Health Inequity of Mexican Immigrants in the United States

Beyond Flint: Lead Poisoning as National Crisis

BY HOLLY ROBINSON The ongoing lead crisis in Flint, Michigan has prompted abundant media coverage on both health issues and political corruption. This attention also increased awareness about the prominence of lead poisoning, bringing similar stories from across the nation to the foreground. At least three other cities—Newark, New York City, and Cleveland—have since reported lead crises of their … Continue reading Beyond Flint: Lead Poisoning as National Crisis

TOMS: Impact and effectiveness of “buy one, give one” model

BY AKHIL UPNEJA For the greater part of a decade, TOMS shoes have been a mainstay in regular footwear. Just like any other shoe, consumers have a variety of reasons for wearing them, including the feel of the canvas or cotton material, the unique comfort, or the company label. The niche the company occupies is its social value: … Continue reading TOMS: Impact and effectiveness of “buy one, give one” model

Mental Health Legacies of the Rwandan Genocide

BY ANABEL STAROSTA Beginning in 1990, a civil war between the Hutu-led government and the Tutsi minority group erupted in Rwanda. In 1994, the civil war escalated into a genocide orchestrated by Hutus against Tutsis. As a result of murder and systematic brutality, genocide against the Tutsis and non-extremist Hutus left approximately one million people dead within a period … Continue reading Mental Health Legacies of the Rwandan Genocide

Family Planning in Refugee Settings

BY HOLLY ROBINSON Sixty-one million people needed humanitarian assistance in 2012.1 The health of these refugees is often thought of as a short-term problem that can be solved by providing only food and water, and the goal is often to sustain refugee populations until they are able to move to a more permanent living situation. It is easy … Continue reading Family Planning in Refugee Settings

Innovation in Global Health: Bridging the Research to Practice Gap and Beyond

BY SANG WON (JOHN) LEE The gap between health research and practice in certain fields purportedly spans 17 years.1 While experts argue about the extent of this lag, they agree that it does exist and must be eliminated. Both the public and private sectors have increasingly pushed for research into the mechanisms that translate knowledge … Continue reading Innovation in Global Health: Bridging the Research to Practice Gap and Beyond

Brazil: The Challenge of Maternal Healthcare

BY REBECCA SLUTSKY Brazil has the largest economy of all Latin American nations. Despite its economic status and its efforts to improve the health of its citizens, morbidity and mortality statistics remain shockingly high. Nearly 50% of babies are delivered by caesarean section, leading to C-section related complications. Furthermore, over a million illegal abortions are performed each year, suggesting … Continue reading Brazil: The Challenge of Maternal Healthcare

An Aging Japan Births New Challenges

BY HOLLY ROBINSON The demography of the world is shifting. Many countries in the world are amidst the transition from a population characterized by a high birth and death rate to one characterized by a low birth and death rate. Japan’s low death rate and even lower birthrate make it the front-runner in this transition. However, it is … Continue reading An Aging Japan Births New Challenges

Gender Equity: A Path towards Food Security

BY PAVANE GORREPATI In a world where many live with plenty, millions still go to bed hungry every night. Women and girls are disproportionately affected by hunger, bearing approximately 60% of the undernourishment burden globally. 1 The issue of food insecurity has historically been attributed to climate and weather, war and displacement, and unstable markets. However, one of … Continue reading Gender Equity: A Path towards Food Security

Morocco: Photo Feature

BY GRACE YI While Morocco boasts a rich culture and diverse landscape, significant health issues still plague a large proportion of their population. Illnesses resulting from poor sanitation are widespread, and tuberculosis is still an endemic health problem. Morocco is furthermore divided geographically; people living in rural areas experience greater poverty than those in urban … Continue reading Morocco: Photo Feature

Health, Homelessness, and Conditional Morality in the United States

BY ERIKA LYNN-GREEN   In 2005, LA Times columnist Steve Lopez met Nathaniel Ayers, a Julliard-educated musician whose diagnosed schizophrenia left him homeless on the streets of Los Angeles. The friendship between the two men grew into a book, as well as the high-profile movie The Soloist. In 2013, with the support of Lopez, a … Continue reading Health, Homelessness, and Conditional Morality in the United States

Looking Past the Data

BY DIKSHA BRAHMBHATT     “So, where exactly is Swaziland?” is a question I became all too familiar with as I shared stories of my experiences during a Yale Summer Session class, “Visual Approaches to Global Health.” Honestly, I was poorly equipped to answer that question before I decided to fly to South Africa and … Continue reading Looking Past the Data

Integrating Modern and Ancient Healing Practices

BY DAN KLUGER   For millions of years, humans have healed themselves using the flora and fauna around them, guided by their own intuitive sense about health. In recent years, humans have vastly increased their survival rates, using Western medicine (also known as allopathic medicine) to treat and cure disease while sometimes dismissing the natural … Continue reading Integrating Modern and Ancient Healing Practices

Oportunidades: The Value of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs

BY CINDY ALVARREZ    Although classified as a middle income country, Mexico is characterized by vast inequality that divides the population into the frivolously wealthy and the extremely poor. In 2000, approximately a quarter of Mexico’s population was living in extreme poverty. In other words, a quarter of Mexico’s population did not have enough income … Continue reading Oportunidades: The Value of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs

United States: Food Advertising and the Rise of Childhood Obesity

BY CARLIN SHERIDAN      In 2013, the American Medical Association formally recognized obesity as a disease for the first time. This designation attempted to combat the widely held misconception that obesity results from simply eating too much or exercising too little.1 Over the past four decades, obesity rates among U.S. teenagers have quadrupled, and … Continue reading United States: Food Advertising and the Rise of Childhood Obesity

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