Issue 4.3 – Spring 2017

Coinfections: Managing a dynamic network of diseases

BY COLIN HEMEZ When it comes to infectious diseases, the presence of one usually means the presence of many. Differences in environment, socioeconomics, and even genetics all conspire to leave some populations with high burdens of many diseases and other populations with low burdens of few diseases. This inconsistent distribution unfortunately results in many cases … Continue reading Coinfections: Managing a dynamic network of diseases

Bangladesh: In Practice

BY SREEJA KODALI Last summer I had the immense privilege of travelling to Dhaka, Bangladesh to assist in the implementation of a new epidemiological study from Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) at the National Institute of Neuro-Sciences (NINS). The study, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), investigates the relationship between epidemic arsenic poisoning and … Continue reading Bangladesh: In Practice

Consider the ASHA: A Qualitative Analysis of Accredited Social Health Activists’ Experiences in Udaipur, India

BY SARA LOCKE Khushi Baby is a wearable mHealth platform tracking maternal and child health to the last mile. Its mission is to reduce infant and maternal mortality due to vaccine-preventable disease. As explained in the Khushi Baby 2016 Annual Report, the Khushi Baby system comprises of a culturally tailored NFC necklace, which digitally stores … Continue reading Consider the ASHA: A Qualitative Analysis of Accredited Social Health Activists’ Experiences in Udaipur, India

Why International Agreements Won’t Solve the Health Crisis of Palm Oil Deforestation in Indonesia

BY AKIELLY HU Last spring break, I had the opportunity to travel to Indonesia to learn about sustainable palm oil with a group from the Yale International Relations Association. As a naïve freshman, I remember asking the group leaders before we left, “What sorts of activism efforts might we do once we get back on … Continue reading Why International Agreements Won’t Solve the Health Crisis of Palm Oil Deforestation in Indonesia

CRISPR/Cas9 and The Future of Global Health

BY AKHIL UPNEJA The discovery of CRISPR/Cas9 has revolutionized the field of genetic engineering in countless ways. From targeting genes conferring antibiotic resistance to creating disease models in animals, the technique offers scientists a fast, cheap, and accurate alternative to every other gene-editing system on the market. While its applications in human disease continue to … Continue reading CRISPR/Cas9 and The Future of Global Health

Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

BY SARAH SPAULDING Throughout much of known human history and prehistory, tuberculosis (TB) has surged and receded along a time scale that challenges much of the accepted scientific understanding of typical epidemic cycles of infectious diseases. Written records of TB appear in Greek literature dating as far back as 460 BCE, with Hippocrates’ description of … Continue reading Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

Digital Health in the Context of China’s Healthcare System

BY MEGAN LAM China’s “Medical Ruckus” March, 2012: Li Mengnan, 17, walked into the First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University in Northern China. He carried a four-inch fruit knife. He impaled the first person he encountered in the neck, injured several medical staff, and then unsuccessfully tried to kill himself before fleeing the scene. … Continue reading Digital Health in the Context of China’s Healthcare System

Zika as a Catalyst for Reproductive Rights Reform in Latin America

BY GRACIE JIN 18-year-old Ianka Barbosa cradles her baby daughter, Sophia, in her parents’ tiny brick house in northeast Brazil. She was 7 months pregnant when she learned that Sophia had microcephaly, the incurable condition causing atypically small heads, severe birth defects, and intellectual disability, which doctors blamed on the Zika virus. Before Sophia was … Continue reading Zika as a Catalyst for Reproductive Rights Reform in Latin America

A Legacy of Imperialism: Health Disparities in the Pacific

BY ERICA KOCHER The Pacific Islands, sometimes known as Oceania, include the regions of Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. These three regions encompass tens of thousands of islands, each of which has a distinct culture. Although Oceania covers approximately 15% of the Earth’s surface area and is home to millions of Pacific Islanders, the unique issues … Continue reading A Legacy of Imperialism: Health Disparities in the Pacific

A New World Health Organization: The Search for a Director-General

BY MATTHEW PETTUS Dr. Margaret Chan, Hong Kong-Canadian physician and Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), will be leaving her position this June, after a ten-year term. This means that the World Health Assembly must commence the search for a new Director-General, someone who can poignantly address the intersection between policy, global health, and … Continue reading A New World Health Organization: The Search for a Director-General

Failure to Fund: The Mexico City Policy’s Impact on Global Health

BY CAROLINE TANGOREN On January 23rd, just two days after the historic Women’s March on Washington demonstrated popular support for women’s rights, President Trump signed an executive order to reinstate the Mexico City Policy, dealing a horrible blow to women’s health globally.1 Broadly speaking, this hot-topic policy prevents any international non-governmental organization (NGO) that provides … Continue reading Failure to Fund: The Mexico City Policy’s Impact on Global Health

White Male Suicide: The Exception to Privelege

BY LAURA MICHAEL In recent years, both the American government and public have given increasing amounts of attention to mental health issues and awareness on college campuses and among adolescents. While college students and adolescents represent two vulnerable populations in America, they are not necessarily at the highest risk for suicide. Although white men historically … Continue reading White Male Suicide: The Exception to Privelege