Issue 3.2 – Winter 2016

Innovation in Global Health: Bridging the Research to Practice Gap and Beyond

BY SANG WON (JOHN) LEE The gap between health research and practice in certain fields purportedly spans 17 years.1 While experts argue about the extent of this lag, they agree that it does exist and must be eliminated. Both the public and private sectors have increasingly pushed for research into the mechanisms that translate knowledge … Continue reading Innovation in Global Health: Bridging the Research to Practice Gap and Beyond

Brazil: The Challenge of Maternal Healthcare

BY REBECCA SLUTSKY Brazil has the largest economy of all Latin American nations. Despite its economic status and its efforts to improve the health of its citizens, morbidity and mortality statistics remain shockingly high. Nearly 50% of babies are delivered by caesarean section, leading to C-section related complications. Furthermore, over a million illegal abortions are performed each year, suggesting … Continue reading Brazil: The Challenge of Maternal Healthcare

Gender Equity: A Path towards Food Security

BY PAVANE GORREPATI In a world where many live with plenty, millions still go to bed hungry every night. Women and girls are disproportionately affected by hunger, bearing approximately 60% of the undernourishment burden globally. 1 The issue of food insecurity has historically been attributed to climate and weather, war and displacement, and unstable markets. However, one of … Continue reading Gender Equity: A Path towards Food Security

Morocco: Photo Feature

BY GRACE YI While Morocco boasts a rich culture and diverse landscape, significant health issues still plague a large proportion of their population. Illnesses resulting from poor sanitation are widespread, and tuberculosis is still an endemic health problem. Morocco is furthermore divided geographically; people living in rural areas experience greater poverty than those in urban … Continue reading Morocco: Photo Feature

Health, Homelessness, and Conditional Morality in the United States

BY ERIKA LYNN-GREEN   In 2005, LA Times columnist Steve Lopez met Nathaniel Ayers, a Julliard-educated musician whose diagnosed schizophrenia left him homeless on the streets of Los Angeles. The friendship between the two men grew into a book, as well as the high-profile movie The Soloist. In 2013, with the support of Lopez, a … Continue reading Health, Homelessness, and Conditional Morality in the United States

Looking Past the Data

BY DIKSHA BRAHMBHATT     “So, where exactly is Swaziland?” is a question I became all too familiar with as I shared stories of my experiences during a Yale Summer Session class, “Visual Approaches to Global Health.” Honestly, I was poorly equipped to answer that question before I decided to fly to South Africa and … Continue reading Looking Past the Data

Integrating Modern and Ancient Healing Practices

BY DAN KLUGER   For millions of years, humans have healed themselves using the flora and fauna around them, guided by their own intuitive sense about health. In recent years, humans have vastly increased their survival rates, using Western medicine (also known as allopathic medicine) to treat and cure disease while sometimes dismissing the natural … Continue reading Integrating Modern and Ancient Healing Practices

Oportunidades: The Value of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs

BY CINDY ALVARREZ    Although classified as a middle income country, Mexico is characterized by vast inequality that divides the population into the frivolously wealthy and the extremely poor. In 2000, approximately a quarter of Mexico’s population was living in extreme poverty. In other words, a quarter of Mexico’s population did not have enough income … Continue reading Oportunidades: The Value of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs

United States: Food Advertising and the Rise of Childhood Obesity

BY CARLIN SHERIDAN      In 2013, the American Medical Association formally recognized obesity as a disease for the first time. This designation attempted to combat the widely held misconception that obesity results from simply eating too much or exercising too little.1 Over the past four decades, obesity rates among U.S. teenagers have quadrupled, and … Continue reading United States: Food Advertising and the Rise of Childhood Obesity

Yale’s Initiatives in Early Childhood Development

BY AMANDA CORCORAN    As the correlation between a child’s first few years of life and future well being is becoming increasingly clear, Yale University and the field of global health broadly are responding to the importance of early childhood development. Research from myriad fields supports that a stable and healthy developmental experience has a … Continue reading Yale’s Initiatives in Early Childhood Development

Samoa: Photo Feature

BY AKIELLY HU These pictures attempt to capture the lush, tropical, and vibrant Samoan way of life, or fa’a Samoa. Many depict the family farm lifestyle, as well as traditional cooking in the umu, or cooking pit. Samoa’s culture is rich with traditional foods, church-related activities, art, dancing, and so much more. Above all, the … Continue reading Samoa: Photo Feature

Samoa: Eating Tinned Fish on a Tropical Island What I Learned About Obesity in Samoa

BY AKIELLY HU     On my second day of living with a host family in Samoa, my host siblings and I rode a bus into the capitol city of Apia. I vividly remember peering over the railing at the top of the Apia government building, wide-eyed at the novelty of the view: stark white … Continue reading Samoa: Eating Tinned Fish on a Tropical Island What I Learned About Obesity in Samoa