Sex Education in India: A Public Problem with a Private Solution?

BY AKILA SHANMUGHAM Housing over a quarter million of the world’s adolescents within its boundaries, India provides the counterpoint to Japan’s hyper-aging society.1 While a society of young people presents the potential for a revitalized workforce and a progressive societal spirit, it must have the resources necessary for the cultivation of its young populace—including sex…

Trump’s Healthcare Proposals

BY EMMA PHELPS Although Donald Trump promised to “not let people die in the streets” throughout his campaign,1 his healthcare proposals will increase the number of Americans without healthcare coverage and make insurance unaffordable for many low and middle-income Americans. He has laid out his bare-bones plan to repeal Obamacare, “modernize” Medicare and “maximize flexibility…

A Cultural Approach to Domestic Violence

BY MARISA LONDON The following piece does not reflect the views of the Yale Global Health Review. In March 2016, the New York Times released an article titled “To Maintain Supply of Sex Slaves, ISIS Pushes Birth Control.” The article discussed the ways in which a corrupt interpretation of Islamic law, coupled with the various…

To Cook or Not to Cook?

BY MAHRUKH SHAHID “To cook or not to cook is a consequential question”.1 The above quote is one of the parting words from Michael Pollan’s documentary Cooked—a four-part miniseries divided into the classical elements: air, earth, fire, and water. Pollan shows us the science, and magic, behind the transformation of these elements into food. His…

Ecuador’s Earthquake: The Mental Health Consequences of Natural Disasters

BY CARLIN SHERIDAN On April 16, 2016 a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Ecuador, killing 659 people and injuring over 16,600.1 As the nation begins its emergency response, the disaster sheds light on the weaknesses of its health infrastructure. Natural disasters can be characterized as a health issue because in addition to causing physical injuries, they also destroy urban,…

Diabetes: Health Inequity of Mexican Immigrants in the United States

BY ANABEL STAROSTA In the United States, Latino immigrants are especially affected by certain illnesses due to social and structural factors beyond their control. Latino immigrants often work as disenfranchised laborers, experience ethnic and cultural discrimination, and remain in low socioeconomic conditions. 1 While certain negative health outcomes are equally prevalent across the greater Latino population, Mexican immigrants in…

Beyond Flint: Lead Poisoning as National Crisis

BY HOLLY ROBINSON The ongoing lead crisis in Flint, Michigan has prompted abundant media coverage on both health issues and political corruption. This attention also increased awareness about the prominence of lead poisoning, bringing similar stories from across the nation to the foreground. At least three other cities—Newark, New York City, and Cleveland—have since reported lead crises of their…