Pura Vida

BY SARA MEYERS “Pura Vida” the saying goes in Costa Rica – “Pure Life”. I have to say I agree and disagree with this label they have given themselves. I witnessed the beauty of Costa Rica, including its abundance of friendly faces, but I also found it was a country in need of much legislation … Continue reading Pura Vida

Acid Attacks in South Asia

BY GRACE YI Recent acid attacks have devastated the lives of women in South Asia, reflecting an unsettling yet unfaltering trend that has persisted for the past several decades.  The purpose of the acid attacks, where acid is thrown onto the face and body, is not to kill (though often it does), but to permanently … Continue reading Acid Attacks in South Asia

Physician Assisted Suicide: A New Global Trend, or a Far Stretch for Policymakers?

BY HOLLY ROBINSON On September 11, the California State Legislature, by a vote of 23 to 14, approved a bill that would allow the practice of physician assisted suicide in the state. If the bill gains the approval of Governor Jerry Brown, California would become the fifth state, alongside Oregon, Washington, Montana, and Vermont, to … Continue reading Physician Assisted Suicide: A New Global Trend, or a Far Stretch for Policymakers?

Ambucycles – the Future of Emergency Response

BY ANABEL STAROSTA When medical emergencies arise and ambulances are called, every second between the event and the treatment counts. While the final goal is to arrive at the hospital as fast as possible, treatment by emergency medical services (EMS) at the scene is often the determining factor for a patient’s survival. For cardiac arrest, … Continue reading Ambucycles – the Future of Emergency Response

The Consequences of High Income Countries’ Perception of Ebola

BY SOFIA LAPIDES-WILSON By September 9th, 2014, Liberia had 2,046 cases of Ebola, with 1,224 deaths.[i] 31% of cases were confirmed by lab tests given limited lab materials.[ii] Most hospitals were at maximum capacity, and patients were turned away,returning to their homes to infect their families. By the end of September at least 3,700 children … Continue reading The Consequences of High Income Countries’ Perception of Ebola

El Hospital Del Niño – Reflections on 6 weeks Immersion

BY HANNAH KRYSTAL Week One In Bolivia, I stand out as a “gringa.” For most Westerners, this term suggests an insulting inability to blend into the background while on South American soil. But to a native Bolivian, it indicates no more than Western characteristics. Even blond hair can earn a Bolivian born and bred in … Continue reading El Hospital Del Niño – Reflections on 6 weeks Immersion

Why was South Korea keeping its schools closed?

BY SAM SUSSMAN In the early weeks of June, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and conflict in the South China Sea were at the forefront of East Asian News discussions. While seemingly unrelated, when viewed together, these two topics can answer a quirky question for news junkies and global health nuts alike: Why did South … Continue reading Why was South Korea keeping its schools closed?

Barriers to Care in São Paulo Home Visiting Programs

BY HOLLY ROBINSON I consider myself to be a person who likes being surrounded by people in small, cozy spaces. However, that didn’t seem to the case when I found myself in the middle seat of a ten-hour red eye flight this May. Though there is only a one-hour time difference between New York and … Continue reading Barriers to Care in São Paulo Home Visiting Programs

Alarmist Chinese coverage of MERS – Counterproductive?

BY ELIZABETH ZHANG Aside from the recent tragedy of the Eastern Star shipping accident and the unsurprising daily glamour coverage of China’s economic boons, one item has invaded the news waves with particularly sustained intensity. The arrival of MERS-coV’s (Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome-coronavirus) patient zero in Huizhou of the Guangdong province has since carved out … Continue reading Alarmist Chinese coverage of MERS – Counterproductive?

Heat waves in India create health threats and warnings for all

BY ANABEL STAROSTA The current heat wave in India began in May 2015. It has brought India the highest recorded temperatures since 1995 and has lead to the deaths of 2,330 people so far. [i] The country cycles through heat waves and monsoons. This year, pre-monsoon showers ended early, causing an extended heat wave that … Continue reading Heat waves in India create health threats and warnings for all