Mental Health Legacies of the Rwandan Genocide

BY ANABEL STAROSTA Beginning in 1990, a civil war between the Hutu-led government and the Tutsi minority group erupted in Rwanda. In 1994, the civil war escalated into a genocide orchestrated by Hutus against Tutsis. As a result of murder and systematic brutality, genocide against the Tutsis and non-extremist Hutus left approximately one million people dead within a period…

Family Planning in Refugee Settings

BY HOLLY ROBINSON Sixty-one million people needed humanitarian assistance in 2012.1 The health of these refugees is often thought of as a short-term problem that can be solved by providing only food and water, and the goal is often to sustain refugee populations until they are able to move to a more permanent living situation. It is easy…

Brazil: The Challenge of Maternal Healthcare

BY REBECCA SLUTSKY Brazil has the largest economy of all Latin American nations. Despite its economic status and its efforts to improve the health of its citizens, morbidity and mortality statistics remain shockingly high. Nearly 50% of babies are delivered by caesarean section, leading to C-section related complications. Furthermore, over a million illegal abortions are performed each year, suggesting…

An Aging Japan Births New Challenges

BY HOLLY ROBINSON The demography of the world is shifting. Many countries in the world are amidst the transition from a population characterized by a high birth and death rate to one characterized by a low birth and death rate. Japan’s low death rate and even lower birthrate make it the front-runner in this transition. However, it is…

Gender Equity: A Path towards Food Security

BY PAVANE GORREPATI In a world where many live with plenty, millions still go to bed hungry every night. Women and girls are disproportionately affected by hunger, bearing approximately 60% of the undernourishment burden globally. 1 The issue of food insecurity has historically been attributed to climate and weather, war and displacement, and unstable markets. However, one of…

Olympic Levels of Water Contamination in Rio de Janeiro

BY AKHIL UPNEJA In July 2015, the Associated Press published a concerning report regarding contamination levels in the waters surrounding Rio de Janeiro, the venue of the 2016 Summer Olympics. In the scathing report, the Associated Press writes “Olympic athletes are almost certain to come into contact with disease-causing viruses that in some tests measured up to 1.7 million…

Tracing the Zika virus Outbreak

BY ANABEL STAROSTA We are no strangers to viral outbreaks and the panic they often incite. As new infections emerge, understanding their trajectories and risks is crucial. Currently, most countries in South and Central America are facing outbreaks of the Zika virus. The pandemic does not appear to be life threatening, but it is spreading quickly. The most concerning aspect…

Vivisection in the 1800s and Today

BY ELIZABETH KITT In the 1800s, vivisection—the practice of experimenting on live animals[i]—sparked a massive controversy. Its proponents upheld its necessity and utility. They lauded the progress that had been possible because vivisection allowed doctors to test surgeries and learn about the body in ways that would help them treat human patients. According to its supporters, vivisection served the…